Aesthetic concepts essays after sibley

He was especially concerned to describe those feeling-based judgments in which an object is found beautiful, and then to show that we are entitled to make such judgments despite being unable to verify them. Thus, for Sibley, "beautiful," "elegant," "graceful," and other terms indicated mainly by example are all aesthetic terms, and as such they all refer to objective properties, although only judges exercising what Sibley calls "taste" can detect these properties and hence correctly apply the terms.

Sibley describes the several ways in which the critic "gets his audience to see what he sees" p. Recently much attention has been given to the separation of ethical concerns from aesthetic concerns Levinsonand in it is a much debated question whether the dubious moral character of an art work can be kept separate from its artistic or aesthetic value.

For Hume, Kant, and Sibley, aesthetic judgments are freely made of works of art Aesthetic concepts essays after sibley also of other objects, and in the latter case there is no need to treat these objects as works of art.

Sibley died inbefore he could assemble a collection of his papers for publication in a single volume. There is no way to inspect an object for its beauty, Hume thought, because "beauty" does not mark any property of an object, but it is possible, as a matter of empirical investigation, to determine whether any particular judge is an exemplary judge.

An early exponent of this idea was Arthur Schopenhaueralthough he does not use the term "aesthetic attitude. Oxford University Press, He thought that the judge must pay no attention to any use to which the object might be put, to any concept that applies to the object, or to any interest that the judge might have in the object.

Aesthetic concepts : essays after Sibley

On the one hand, such a position makes aesthetic Aesthetic concepts essays after sibley quite an important task, if the distinctive qualities of artworks are out of reach even to those who are cognitively and perceptually well-equipped. And yet, if no rules or general standards can be brought to the experience of art, one might well wonder just how such an education is to be carried out.

View freely available titles: Indeed, the etymology of the word "aesthetic" indicates that an aesthetic judgment must be essentially related to a feeling. Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary. According to Hume, the term "beauty" does not correspond to any objective property of things, and so judgments of beauty cannot be correct or incorrect in any straightforward manner.

In contrast, other philosophers have thought that even though such judgments are genuinely objective, they are nonetheless incapable of being verified by customary procedures.

For Hume and Kant, the term "beauty" has very little semantic content, it indicating only that the object produces a particular feeling of pleasure in the judge.

These exemplars of taste whose responses, he said, constitute a "standard of taste" are identified by their stellar discernment, without prejudice, of all the properties of the objects being judged.

These include pointing out salient non-aesthetic features, using the aesthetic terms themselves, making use of metaphors, contrasts, comparisons, and so on. But then, what stops any one of us from seeing that a painting is imbalanced or lurid? Bibliography Brady, Emily, and Jerrold Levinson, eds.

That is, "there are no non-aesthetic features which serve in any circumstances as logically sufficient conditions for applying aesthetic terms" p.

Sibley is aware of this tension. Hume does not use the term "aesthetic," and he speaks only of the exercise of taste in the discernment of beauty, but like Kant he takes it for granted that all judgments of beauty arise from feelings of pleasure experienced by the judge.

The solution lies first in realizing that the aesthetic terminology is not different in kind from "everyday" language. He thus effectively regarded successful works of art which for him meant artificial beautiful objects as loci for such judgments.

David Hume is an example. The editors were confronted with the difficult question of what to do with many of these latter pieces. Rather than understand taste as Hume and Kant did, as the ability to take pleasure in the judgment of objects, Sibley takes taste to be the ability to use aesthetic terms and concepts.

AESTHETIC JUDGMENT

Sibley takes aesthetic judgments to be judgments that apply aesthetic concepts to objects through the use of aesthetic terms. A radically different thesis is that of Frank Sibley To other authors, this is not obvious, because for them, questions of utility are difficult to separate from questions of the aesthetic value of an object.

He published no monographs outlining his views, but managed nonetheless to make highly influential contributions to research in aesthetics through a small number of papers. Sibley notices that in support of aesthetic judgments, we often but not always adduce reasons which involve non-aesthetic concepts only.

Somewhat curiously, perhaps, some philosophers have thought that even though such judgments are subjective, they are still capable of being supported.

Furthermore, in view of his conviction that aesthetic judgments are objective, Sibley treats the term "beautiful" quite differently from his eighteenth-century predecessors.

Lectures and Essays Stanford, CA: Approach to Aesthetics is perhaps the next best thing — a collection of essays assembled and shaped by a highly conscientious editorial team.

The claim is strict, and in the tradition which says that nothing can substitute for individual, spontaneous contact with an artwork to judge its aesthetic qualities; no application of principles will suffice.

It is less clear that that a poorly performing object can still be beautiful. By "aesthetic judgment" Kant meant a judgment based on a feeling.

Translated by Paul Guyer and Eric Matthews.Read "Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley, Mind" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips. Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley.

Emily Brady & Jerrold Levinson (eds.) - - Oxford University Press. Aesthetic Virtues in the Context of Nirvanic mi-centre.com: Frank Sibley. Sibley takes aesthetic judgments to be judgments that apply aesthetic concepts to objects through the use of aesthetic terms. Rather than understand taste as Hume and Kant did, as the ability to take pleasure in the judgment of objects, Sibley takes taste to be the ability to use aesthetic terms and concepts.

Clarendon has published Aesthetic Concepts: Essays After Sibley as a companion to the collection of Sibley's work.

It, too, is a valuable contribution, and evidence of Sibley's agenda-setting influence on subsequent work in aesthetics. Aesthetic Concepts is an exploration of key topics in contemporary aesthetics that arise from the seminal work of Frank Sibley ().

Sibley developed a distinctive aesthetic theory through a number of papers published between and (a selection of which, entitled Approach toAesthetics, is also published by OUP). Sibley's theory is grounded in the important and influential.

Get this from a library! Aesthetic concepts: essays after Sibley. [Emily Brady; Jerrold Levinson;] -- This text is an exploration of key topics in contemporary aesthetics that arise from the seminal work of Frank Sibley.

He developed a distinctive aesthetic theory through a number of papers published.

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Aesthetic concepts essays after sibley
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